Litigation

The right to an emotional support animal in housing

August 25th, 2022 by Safia Lakhani

Despite the positive impact emotional support animals have on the lives of their humans, keeping them in certain housing situations, like condominiums and no-pet residences, can be an uphill battle.

Dogs make great emotional support animals. Credit: Richard Brutyo / Unsplash

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Tenants now more vulnerable than ever – eviction at the Superior Court of Justice

August 24th, 2022 by Hunter Stone

The Landlord and Tenant Board (the LTB) is governed by the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006, S.O (the RTA), C.17, and hears matters brought by landlords and tenants regarding the rental property.

In March 2020, the world‑wide COVID‑19 pandemic hit the LTB like a ton of bricks, causing extreme backlog at the tribunal. The LTB responded by adopting an electronic approach to filing materials and hearing matters, eliminating in person hearings entirely. This electronic approach was an attempt to deliver service in a time conscious manner. Despite these efforts, the LTB was and is still experiencing backlog due to the pandemic, leaving many landlords feeling frustrated about the delayed hearing process and issuance of orders. With few avenues to turn to, landlords are utilizing the Superior Court of Justice (the Superior Court) to evict their tenants living in condo units. Continue reading “Tenants now more vulnerable than ever – eviction at the Superior Court of Justice”

To record on Zoom or not – that is the question

August 16th, 2022 by Maggie Fleming

In March 2020, many organizations moved their annual general meetings (AGMs) and board meetings to the internet using platforms like Zoom. Lots of these meetings have stayed online, and for good reason – it’s a way to involve people previously unable to attend and offers an accessible option for those that are not comfortable attending in‑person. For some organizations, pressing the “record” button has become a regular practice. The stated reason often being for minute taking.

But recording, and keeping those recordings, is not without its legal issues. Continue reading “To record on Zoom or not – that is the question”

Rent Increase Guideline for 2023

July 18th, 2022 by Hunter Stone

Earlier this year we wrote about the rent increase guidelines for 2022, which lists the current allowable amount a landlord can increase their tenants’ rent by 1.2 per cent.

On June 29, 2022, the Government of Ontario stated the rent increase guideline for 2023 will be 2.5 per cent, noting this rate is below that of inflation. The last time a rent increase guideline was 2.5 per cent was in 2013. Continue reading “Rent Increase Guideline for 2023”

Judicial activism gone wrong: Abortion rights in America

July 4th, 2022 by Michael Hackl

After the majority decision in Dobbs, we should not assume that the right to an abortion is permanently entrenched in Canadian law.

Huge crowd at the Supreme Court the night after the release of Alito’s draft majority opinion overturning Roe v. Wade Credit: Victoria Pickering / Flickr

A seismic shift in the law just occurred in the United States, as the Supreme Court issued its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, overturning almost 50 years of precedent set by Roe v. Wade, and setting the table for millions of women to be denied the right to an abortion in the country.

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Vaccines, masking, and human rights: where do we go from here

April 28th, 2022 by Safia Lakhani

Legally speaking, mandatory vaccination policies may be permissible in the context of employment, business, and housing. However, such policies should account for possible exemptions under the applicable human rights legislation.

Where do we draw the line between human rights, and masking and vaccine mandates?

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