Charities

Canada’s social economy about to get a boost, but problems remain

February 7th, 2020 by Brian Iler

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Canada’s social economy — those social enterprises (nonprofits, charities and co-operatives) that generate income in pursuit of social goals instead of profit — is about to get quite a boost.

Quietly, but thoughtfully and effectively, the federal government has initiated and funded, with serious money, a brand-new program creating the Social Finance Fund, to drastically expand the social economy.

This year, $50 million is flowing, and is set to quickly increase to $75 million per year for the next 10 years.

The fund is intended to address a major impediment to growth of the social economy — the shortage of investment capital.

While the private sector readily raises millions through Bay Street’s financial institutions, social enterprises don’t attract their interest. Instead, to be successful, social enterprises rely heavily on the communities they serve for financial support. And that often isn’t enough.

Hence the fund.

The creation of the fund was one of 12 recommendations in support of social innovation and social finance made to the federal government made in August 2018 by a steering group broadly representative of social economy organizations. Continue reading “Canada’s social economy about to get a boost, but problems remain” »

Exploring new ways for charities to work in partnerships

December 10th, 2019 by Ted Hyland

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Registered charities in Canada find themselves increasingly drawn to find ways of operating through partnerships and networks. There are two legal impediments they face in doing their work. One is the requirement under the Income Tax Act that charities carry on their own activities themselves, known as the “direction and control” requirement. The other impediment is the prohibition against registered charities making gifts to any entity that is not a qualified donee (qualified donees are registered charities and other various tax-exempt entities specified in the act).

The Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) view is that charities are allowed to use their resources in only one of two ways: either by making gifts to other qualified donees (for most charities, this means to other registered charities) or by applying their resources to their “own activities,” which the charities must carry on themselves.

It is in this context that the Senate Special Committee on the Charitable Sector, established in January 2018, held hearings into the effect of laws and policies on the charitable sector. It issued its report, Catalyst for Change: A Roadmap to a Stronger Charitable Sector, in June 2019.

Continue reading “Exploring new ways for charities to work in partnerships” »

Client Profile: Assisted‑Dying Resources Centres Canada

June 19th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

Logo for Assisted-Dying Resource Centres Canada
Following the Supreme Court of Canada’s Carter decision in 2015, Canadians acquired a right to receive medical assistance in death (MAiD). Legislation came into force in June 2016 amending the Criminal Code to allow MAiD in limited circumstances. Since then, thousands have exercised this right – many in their own homes, others in hospitals, and still others in other kinds of institutions.

For some, though, where to receive medical assistance in death is a needless stress. Homeless patients who might otherwise be eligible cannot exercise this right because shelters do not allow it; many hospices have policies that prevent patients from having medically assisted deaths; some nursing homes and retirement homes – especially faith based ones – have said “no” to MAiD; and finally, some patents prefer not to die in their own homes because of the memories it may leave for their loved ones. Continue reading “Client Profile: Assisted‑Dying Resources Centres Canada” »

Client Profile: Jean Tweed Centre

February 15th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

Jean Tweed was a woman who saw the need for a safe and supportive environment for women to address their substance use issues. She was a pioneer in advancing the cause of women-specific programming. In 1983, the Jean Tweed Centre was established in her honour.

Jean Tweed Centre has evolved and grown to become a leading community-based substance abuse, mental health and problem gambling agency for women in Ontario, offering a wide range of services including:

  • residential and day programming
  • out-patient programming including family and trauma counselling
  • individual counselling and continuing care
  • outreach services for women who are pregnant and parenting women, have concurrent mental health and substance use challenges or involved in the criminal justice system.
  • transition and supportive housing

Continue reading “Client Profile: Jean Tweed Centre” »

Client Profile: Tangled Art + Disability

January 22nd, 2019 by Iler Campbell
Cripping the Arts. January 24-26, 2019 at Harbourfront Centre. Cripping the Arts is co-hosted by British Counciel, Creative Users Projects, Tangled Art + Disability, Ryerson University and Harbourfront Centre.

Poster for Cripping the Arts: a three day festival of panel discussions, co-creative workshops, exhibitions and performances animating how Deaf and Disability arts and activism changes how we experience art and culture as well as the ways the sector contributes, and leads to, the achievements of disability rights and justice movements.

Tangled Art + Disability occupies an important space in  Toronto’s arts landscape, dedicated to enhancing opportunities for Deaf, Mad, and Disability-identified artists. Since 2003, it has produced annual festivals, gallery exhibitions, performances, and more, employing hundreds of artists and attracting audiences in the thousands from all parts of the community.

Continue reading “Client Profile: Tangled Art + Disability” »

Notice to Charities: Updated CRA Address for T3010 Registered Charity Information Returns

September 20th, 2018 by Iler Campbell

To our registered charity clients and other registered charities following our blog, please note that, as of October 8, 2018, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will have a new mailing address for filing Registered Charity Information Returns (T3010). Registered charities are required to submit these returns annually.

This updated address is only for filing T3010 returns. All other correspondence should continue to be submitted to the CRA at its Ottawa address.

Continue reading “Notice to Charities: Updated CRA Address for T3010 Registered Charity Information Returns” »