Not for Profit Law

Client Profile: rabble.ca

November 13th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

A table with a rabble.ca banner, covered in pamphlets with a large hand-painted sign behind which reads 'Beautiful CHAOS'.

Founded by Judy Rebick in 2001, rabble.ca is an on‑line magazine for the Canadian progressive community. It was built on the efforts of journalists, writers, artists and activists across the country and has a unique role of reporting on stories from civil society, providing a counterbalance to corporate-owned media. For over 18 years, rabble has amplified the voice of social movements and grassroots activism across the country. rabble.ca is proud to say that, despite the crowded landscape of progressive on‑line news sources, it gets up to 450,000 visitors monthly – numbers that continue to grow. It attracts these numbers by featuring some of the best new and emerging progressive voices in Canada.

Iler Campbell and rabble.ca have a relationship dating back to its inception when they consulted us on the inevitable legal issues that arise for any new non‑profit, and definitely for a progressive news organization that occasionally dips its toe into controversial waters. We remain on standby to provide what we hope is quick and useful advice on legal issues faced by rabble.ca as a mature organization.

Beginning in March 2012, we were proud to say “yes” to rabble.ca’s offer for Iler Campbell to contribute a monthly column, “pro bono”. Former Iler Campbell lawyer, Paula Boutis, kicked things off with an article on election law. Since then, we’ve written on topics as wide ranging as: environmental issues, housing, international labour standards, medically assisted death, impact investing, the legal profession, cannabis, non‑profit governance, Canada’ prison system, and human rights.

As well as providing content for rabble’s website, these articles also feature on our firm blog where we hope that they contribute to much‑needed debates on all of these topics. To see them all as they appear on the Iler Campbell blog, click here.

September 2019 marked our 90th column from 17 different lawyers and articling students who have been at the firm, including the eight who currently comprise Iler Campbell LLP. We couldn’t be prouder!

Client Profile: Toronto Outdoor Picture Show

October 16th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

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Toronto Outdoor Picture Show (TOPS) is a Toronto‑based not-for profit that was originally founded in 2011 with its signature project, Christie Pits Film Festival (CPFF), a summer-long festival of free outdoor film screenings in the natural amphitheatre of Toronto’s Christie Pits Park.

CPFF is now Toronto’s largest public outdoor film festival and the epitome of magical summer evenings for many local residents. In 2015, the organization officially incorporated and adopted TOPS as its umbrella name. Since then, it has since expanded its programming and offers a summer‑long season across other areas of the city – from North York to Fort York, Toronto’s east side to Etobicoke – and has reached an audience of over 60,000 people over its 9-summer history. Each summer, the organization programs a combination of popular and critically-acclaimed feature films alongside local and Canadian short and feature films that celebrate excellent homegrown talent. Read the rest of this entry

Video: Community Land Trusts – everything you’ve wanted to know

August 9th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

Community land trusts – What do they do? How are they formed? How can you find out more about this type of organization to try to start one in your own community?

A video of Iler Campbell lawyer, Claudia Pedrero’s webinar on the topic is now online. In the webinar, Claudia goes over the community land trust model, and how this form of organization can, and is, being used as a grass-roots model for community stewardship of land and community assets. Drawing on her work both as a lawyer and a board member of a Toronto community land trust, she explains how community land trusts differ from non-profit organizations, and how community land trusts are presenting themselves as an alternative form of land ownership and management.

Download a copy of her presentation here.

Free webinar: Community Land Trusts – everything you’ve wanted to know

July 17th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

Community land trusts – What do they do? How are they formed? How can you find out more about this type of organization to try to start one in your own community? Iler Campbell lawyer, Claudia Pedrero, will discuss the community land trust model, and how this form of organization can, and is, being used as a grass-roots model for community stewardship of land and community assets. Drawing on her work both as a lawyer and a board member of a Toronto community land trust, Claudia will discuss how community land trusts differ from non-profit organizations, and how community land trusts are presenting themselves as an alternative form of land ownership and management.

Join us August 8 at 12:30 PM 

Register to attend here.

Can’t attend but would like to be sent the recording afterwards? Sign up to be notified here. (We’ll send the recording out to all attendees too, so no need to sign up twice.)

The LTB has become slooooow. Is there relief on the horizon?

May 10th, 2019 by Celia Chandler

Many of our housing clients have been disappointed recently about the length of time it takes to conduct business at the Landlord and Tenant Board. Rest assured, we are doing our very best to push things along as quickly as we can. The LTB acknowledges the delay on its website:

Over past months, parties have experienced service delays at the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB). The LTB continues to work with the government to improve its services. A number of experienced adjudicators have recently been reappointed and recruitment is under way to fill other adjudicator vacancies. On January 1, 2019, the LTB became part of the newly created Tribunals Ontario organization. A review will be conducted of all tribunals, including the LTB, to identify areas for improvement to make services more streamlined, cost-effective and efficient.

This is not new – the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail both reported on the delay, and on the LTB admission of the problem, six months ago. We see no improvement since then.

Read the rest of this entry

Community land trusts a model for community-led land stewardship

April 25th, 2019 by Claudia Pedrero

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Last week marked the first meeting of the Canadian Network of Community Land Trusts held on Canadian soil.

The group’s meeting in Montreal was attended by community land trusts from across Canada, most of them from British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. It’s indicative of a rise in popularity of this alternative model of land ownership, as communities grapple with increasingly unaffordable housing prices, and commercial development changes the social, cultural and economic diversity of neighbourhoods. The Canadian Network of Community Land Trusts is seeking to share the collective experience and expertise of Canadian land trusts while expanding the footprint of this model of land ownership.

Read the rest of this entry