Not for Profit Law

The LTB has become slooooow. Is there relief on the horizon?

May 10th, 2019 by Celia Chandler

Many of our housing clients have been disappointed recently about the length of time it takes to conduct business at the Landlord and Tenant Board. Rest assured, we are doing our very best to push things along as quickly as we can. The LTB acknowledges the delay on its website:

Over past months, parties have experienced service delays at the Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB). The LTB continues to work with the government to improve its services. A number of experienced adjudicators have recently been reappointed and recruitment is under way to fill other adjudicator vacancies. On January 1, 2019, the LTB became part of the newly created Tribunals Ontario organization. A review will be conducted of all tribunals, including the LTB, to identify areas for improvement to make services more streamlined, cost-effective and efficient.

This is not new – the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail both reported on the delay, and on the LTB admission of the problem, six months ago. We see no improvement since then.

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Community land trusts a model for community-led land stewardship

April 25th, 2019 by Claudia Pedrero

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Last week marked the first meeting of the Canadian Network of Community Land Trusts held on Canadian soil.

The group’s meeting in Montreal was attended by community land trusts from across Canada, most of them from British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. It’s indicative of a rise in popularity of this alternative model of land ownership, as communities grapple with increasingly unaffordable housing prices, and commercial development changes the social, cultural and economic diversity of neighbourhoods. The Canadian Network of Community Land Trusts is seeking to share the collective experience and expertise of Canadian land trusts while expanding the footprint of this model of land ownership.

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Seniors Co-Housing:
Re-Thinking Traditional Housing Models for Canada’s Growing Senior Population

March 28th, 2019 by Brian Iler and Claudia Pedrero

This article was originally prepared for the Ontario Bar Association’s Real Property Law & Elder Law program on March 22, 2019

The Toronto Star recently featured a High Park co-housing project – Wine on the Porch. That project, its story, and a small handful of others like it, has helped spark renewed interest in co-housing (or collaborative housing) in Ontario.

That story began:

“It began half in jest — two couples enjoying their annual weekend getaway, strolling the streets of Stratford, Ont., wistfully admiring the pretty Victorians and wondering aloud about the future.

“Would it be feasible to avoid the loneliness that creeps with age by joining forces in a private home with room for shared meals and laughter and cosy nooks for private chats or reading?”

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Spring event roundup

March 13th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

It’s been a long, snowy winter and we’re more than ready to emerge again to engage with our clients and others in the sector.  Please check us out at these spring events!

Please say “hi” if you’re at these events.   We look forward to seeing you.

Reminder: Ontario corporations must keep track of the land in Ontario in which they have an “Ownership Interest”

November 27th, 2018 by Ted Hyland

Deadline – December 10, 2018

In 2015, the Ontario Legislature enacted the Forfeited Corporate Property Act, 2015, which deals with what happens to property, including land and interests in land, which corporations own at the moment that they cease to exist.

Ordinarily, if a corporation owns land (or any property) when it is dissolved, the land “escheats” (is forfeited) to the Crown.  Sometimes – often – the corporation is dissolved because of its failure to make its annual filings, and the dissolution occurs unbeknownst to the owners / directors of the corporation.

As part of imposing some rationalization on keeping track of the land in Ontario that Ontario corporations own, the Forfeited Corporate Property Act, 2015 amended the Business Corporations Act (Ontario) and the Corporations Act (Ontario) to require corporations governed by those statutes to complete and maintain a register of all of their “ownership interests” in land located in Ontario.  (When it comes into effect, the Not‑for‑Profit Corporations Act will also impose this rule on the corporations that it governs; co‑operative corporations, on the other hand, have been spared the obligation to have such a register.) We previously wrote about this in March of 2017.

If your organization has been in existence since before December 10, 2016 and is either a business corporation incorporated under the Business Corporations Act (Ontario) or a non‑profit corporation incorporated under the Corporations Act (Ontario), then it has until this coming December 10th to put such a register in place.
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The Law Society is flirting with the idea of doing away with articling. Should it?

July 26th, 2018 by Celia Chandler

This article was first published on rabble.ca

One hundred thirty-seven — yes, that’s right: 137. And last year, 150!

These are the number of applicants we received for one articling position for the period July 2019 to May 2020. For readers not in law in Ontario, articling is a 10-month work placement under the supervision of a lawyer. Completing articles is a condition to practising law in Ontario.

The competition for securing articles is so intense that the Law Society of Ontario (LSO) has explored alternatives and is flirting with the idea of giving up on articling altogether.

Bad idea. We don’t want to lose an important training ground for progressive lawyers. Our law firm, Iler Campbell LLP, is unusual as a place where young lawyers can gain experience working for non‑profits, charities, co‑ops, social enterprise and the like. We see hiring articling students as an obligation to the legal profession and to the progressive organizations that we serve. Our tagline is “A law firm for those who want to make the world a little bit better.” Articling here and in other like‑minded firms helps build a cadre of advocates for that better world.

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