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Client Profile: rabble.ca

November 13th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

A table with a rabble.ca banner, covered in pamphlets with a large hand-painted sign behind which reads 'Beautiful CHAOS'.

Founded by Judy Rebick in 2001, rabble.ca is an on‑line magazine for the Canadian progressive community. It was built on the efforts of journalists, writers, artists and activists across the country and has a unique role of reporting on stories from civil society, providing a counterbalance to corporate-owned media. For over 18 years, rabble has amplified the voice of social movements and grassroots activism across the country. rabble.ca is proud to say that, despite the crowded landscape of progressive on‑line news sources, it gets up to 450,000 visitors monthly – numbers that continue to grow. It attracts these numbers by featuring some of the best new and emerging progressive voices in Canada.

Iler Campbell and rabble.ca have a relationship dating back to its inception when they consulted us on the inevitable legal issues that arise for any new non‑profit, and definitely for a progressive news organization that occasionally dips its toe into controversial waters. We remain on standby to provide what we hope is quick and useful advice on legal issues faced by rabble.ca as a mature organization.

Beginning in March 2012, we were proud to say “yes” to rabble.ca’s offer for Iler Campbell to contribute a monthly column, “pro bono”. Former Iler Campbell lawyer, Paula Boutis, kicked things off with an article on election law. Since then, we’ve written on topics as wide ranging as: environmental issues, housing, international labour standards, medically assisted death, impact investing, the legal profession, cannabis, non‑profit governance, Canada’ prison system, and human rights.

As well as providing content for rabble’s website, these articles also feature on our firm blog where we hope that they contribute to much‑needed debates on all of these topics. To see them all as they appear on the Iler Campbell blog, click here.

September 2019 marked our 90th column from 17 different lawyers and articling students who have been at the firm, including the eight who currently comprise Iler Campbell LLP. We couldn’t be prouder!

Priya Sarin included in rabble.ca’s best of 2013 collection

June 20th, 2013 by Iler Campbell

Last night marked the launch of rabble.ca’s latest publication, Red Squares, White Feathers: Best of rabble.ca 2013, and we’re very pleased to let you know that one of Priya’s articles is included in the book. In rabble’s words:

What a collection! Read Judy Rebick’s reflections on the 2012 political year, Maher Arar on Torture, Pam Palmater on Harper’s attack on Indigenous people, Karl Nerenberg on the racism facing the Roma, and Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois on capitalism, Quebec politics and the student movement. And that’s not all! Keep reading and you will find Murray Dobbin on the need to talk taxes, Priya Sarin on eroding labour rights, Nora Loreto on the responsibility to act for non-Indigenous people. Plus tons more!

You can read Priya’s article here, and buy the book here for the very reasonable cost of $10.00 + $2.95 shipping/handling.

Pro Bono – A new column on rabble.ca

March 30th, 2012 by Iler Campbell LLP

We’re pleased to announce that we’ve joined forces with rabble.ca to write a new monthly column called Pro Bono.

In our first entry, Paula Boutis writes about the March 8, 2012 NDP motion which expands the investigative powers of Elections Canada in response to the “robocall” scandal. The motion passed unanimously. Paula explains what this will mean.

Read it here

How will Ontario’s increase in small claims court limits affect access to justice?

October 31st, 2019 by Claudia Pedrero

This article was first published on rabble.ca

As of January 1, 2020, Ontario will increase the value of claims that can be brought before the province’s small claims court. Soon, the maximum claim that can be filed will increase from $25,000 to $35,000.

Small claims court is a branch of the Superior Court of Justice that hears civil disputes. If a person has a claim that exceeds the maximum limit for small claims court, they need to pursue the case through the Superior Court of Justice or go through small claims court and limit the amount of the claim.

Ontario’s intent is to make it “faster, easier, and more affordable to settle claims,” while trying to alleviate some of the backlog at the provincial Superior Court of Justice, which the province notes is one of the busiest courts in Canada.

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Bill 21 allows tyranny of the majority to trump minority rights

September 27th, 2019 by Michael Hackl

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Earlier this week, Quebec’s Human Rights Commission released a 327-page report (a 32-page summary can be found here), documenting xenophobic and Islamophobic acts of hate. The commission found that crimes reported and classified as hate crimes have been on the rise across Canada over the past decade, and in Quebec the two most targeted groups in hate crimes reported to the police in 2017 were Muslims and Arabs (and 78 per cent of xenophobic or Islamophobic acts were not even reported to the police). Further, the respondents to the study had experienced an average of three xenophobic or Islamophobic acts, and 35 per cent of the victims said they had changed their lifestyle as a result of encountering acts of hate.

The report’s recommendations include taking steps to address systemic discrimination. Myrlande Pierre, vice‑president of the Quebec Human Rights Commission, stated: “Systemic or structural racism exists. Quebec is not exempt from this phenomenon.”

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Some positive steps, but more work needed to improve Canada’s prisons

August 29th, 2019 by Karly Wilson

This article was first published on rabble.ca 

If the allegations against American billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein were not alarming enough on their own, his story became even darker earlier this month when, on the morning of August 10, he was found dead in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York from an apparent suicide. His death dominated the news cycle, causing outcry across the political spectrum over the quality of the security at the prison, the frequency with which guards checked on his safety, and why he was taken off  suicide watch despite having an apparent attempt just weeks earlier. To those who have kept an eye on the American carceral system, however, this was a pretty typical day, just with more news coverage.

The varied and systemic problems with prisons in the U.S. are not new, and they are not improving. In the past year alone, the U.S. prison system has frequently been in the headlines, from investigations into the extreme violence in Alabama state prisons, to the weeks-long power outage this winter in Brooklyn, to the high-profile murder of South Boston mobster James (Whitey) Bulger during a routine transfer. Underfunded, filled-to-bursting from the effects of mandatory minimums in the war on drugs, and guarded by a handful of underpaid workers struggling to stay safe and make ends meet — the violence within U.S. prisons is as horrifying as it is unsurprising.

But what about Canada?

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