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Client Profile: rabble.ca

November 13th, 2019 by Iler Campbell

A table with a rabble.ca banner, covered in pamphlets with a large hand-painted sign behind which reads 'Beautiful CHAOS'.

Founded by Judy Rebick in 2001, rabble.ca is an on‑line magazine for the Canadian progressive community. It was built on the efforts of journalists, writers, artists and activists across the country and has a unique role of reporting on stories from civil society, providing a counterbalance to corporate-owned media. For over 18 years, rabble has amplified the voice of social movements and grassroots activism across the country. rabble.ca is proud to say that, despite the crowded landscape of progressive on‑line news sources, it gets up to 450,000 visitors monthly – numbers that continue to grow. It attracts these numbers by featuring some of the best new and emerging progressive voices in Canada.

Iler Campbell and rabble.ca have a relationship dating back to its inception when they consulted us on the inevitable legal issues that arise for any new non‑profit, and definitely for a progressive news organization that occasionally dips its toe into controversial waters. We remain on standby to provide what we hope is quick and useful advice on legal issues faced by rabble.ca as a mature organization.

Beginning in March 2012, we were proud to say “yes” to rabble.ca’s offer for Iler Campbell to contribute a monthly column, “pro bono”. Former Iler Campbell lawyer, Paula Boutis, kicked things off with an article on election law. Since then, we’ve written on topics as wide ranging as: environmental issues, housing, international labour standards, medically assisted death, impact investing, the legal profession, cannabis, non‑profit governance, Canada’ prison system, and human rights.

As well as providing content for rabble’s website, these articles also feature on our firm blog where we hope that they contribute to much‑needed debates on all of these topics. To see them all as they appear on the Iler Campbell blog, click here.

September 2019 marked our 90th column from 17 different lawyers and articling students who have been at the firm, including the eight who currently comprise Iler Campbell LLP. We couldn’t be prouder!

Priya Sarin included in rabble.ca’s best of 2013 collection

June 20th, 2013 by Iler Campbell

Last night marked the launch of rabble.ca’s latest publication, Red Squares, White Feathers: Best of rabble.ca 2013, and we’re very pleased to let you know that one of Priya’s articles is included in the book. In rabble’s words:

What a collection! Read Judy Rebick’s reflections on the 2012 political year, Maher Arar on Torture, Pam Palmater on Harper’s attack on Indigenous people, Karl Nerenberg on the racism facing the Roma, and Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois on capitalism, Quebec politics and the student movement. And that’s not all! Keep reading and you will find Murray Dobbin on the need to talk taxes, Priya Sarin on eroding labour rights, Nora Loreto on the responsibility to act for non-Indigenous people. Plus tons more!

You can read Priya’s article here, and buy the book here for the very reasonable cost of $10.00 + $2.95 shipping/handling.

Pro Bono – A new column on rabble.ca

March 30th, 2012 by Iler Campbell LLP

We’re pleased to announce that we’ve joined forces with rabble.ca to write a new monthly column called Pro Bono.

In our first entry, Paula Boutis writes about the March 8, 2012 NDP motion which expands the investigative powers of Elections Canada in response to the “robocall” scandal. The motion passed unanimously. Paula explains what this will mean.

Read it here

Federal government should prioritize moving MAID back up its legislative agenda

June 25th, 2020 by Celia Chandler

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Think back.

March 13, 2020.

While many of us moved our offices to our homes, scrambled to figure out how to school our children, fought for scarce toilet paper and Lysol, and started to get used to a completely different way of living, the government released its “What We Heard Report A Public Consultations on Medical Assistance in Dying.” The report resulted from a 14 day window in January when Canadians commented online about the medical assistance in dying law in Canada (called MAID).

Regular rabble.ca readers will know that I wrote a three-part series about the legalization of MAID and its implementation from my first-hand experience: my husband, Jack, died with medical assistance in November 2018.

The federal government legalized MAID in 2016. You’ll know from my account and those of many others, that the MAID law is not without its critics because of those excluded from the legislation: mature minors; those wanting to make “advance requests”; those whose only medical condition is mental illness; and those with physical illness but for whom death is not reasonably foreseeable. The Council of Canadian Academies has studied and reported on the first three of these issues.

Continue reading “Federal government should prioritize moving MAID back up its legislative agenda”

The right to know? Balancing health risks and privacy rights for landlords during COVID-19

May 29th, 2020 by Claudia Pedrero

This article was first published on rabble.ca

What is a landlord’s responsibility when a tenant in a multi-residential building tests positive for COVID-19? Is a landlord obligated to share this information with other residents so they can take extra precautions? On the flip side, what expectation of privacy do tenants have if they share this information with their landlord?

Many of our firm’s housing clients have had to grapple with this difficult balance over the past few months as they weather the challenges brought on by the pandemic. Continue reading “The right to know? Balancing health risks and privacy rights for landlords during COVID-19”

Defining ‘urgent’ in the global pandemic

May 1st, 2020 by Karly Wilson

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Seven weeks ago, we rolled our eyes when an email was labelled “Urgent.” It felt like a term thrown around too often, and with little meaning or weight. Like new alerts popping up on cell phones, there didn’t seem to be enough discernment about what was and was not worthy of panic and alarm.

Now, everything is urgent. There is an urgent need for medical supplies, for funding, for mental health support, for employment insurance reform, for a vaccine, for a cure. This has created an awkward and noticeable push to fill needs that social justice advocates have always considered urgent, but are suddenly (urgently!) gaining widespread support.

Individuals with disabilities, long having been told that their needs are too big to accommodate, are watching mass support roll out to assist the workforce. Advocates for a universal basic income are watching as the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) is instituted in a matter of weeks. At our firm, a large part of our practice focuses on supporting affordable housing initiatives, and we too have watched as our city (Toronto) has suddenly been at the forefront of creating new housing solutions for individuals experiencing homelessness.

In short, we are seeing concerns long considered urgent to finally be met with a sense of … well … urgency. Continue reading “Defining ‘urgent’ in the global pandemic”